collect 2014
Bishopsland Silver & Gold
Ndidi Ekubi, Mini ‘Petal’ Jug / Pourers (limited edition) Britannia silver with gold plate interior

On Sunday Brig and I headed to the Saatchi Gallery for this year’s Collect exhibition. Organised by The Crafts Council, Collect  – The International Art Fair for Contemporary Objects – aims to brings together museum-quality from international galleries and selected Project Space artists. It’s always a glorious mix of the unexpected, from ceramics to art jewellery, silverware to paper cuts.

Here are a few of the pieces that caught my eye:

collect 2014
Min Soo Lee – This piece was purchased for the University of Durham’s Oriental Museum, with the help of Art Fund Collect.

collect 2014
Jung Hong Park uses the technique of sang-gam (inlay work) to create his signature lines in the ceramic works. He inlays the lines with diamond blades and coats a thin layer of colour pigment; then polishes the whole object again to create a smooth pebble-like texture. His delicate and exact lines are all  all hand made, although they are often mistaken for manufactured.

collect 2014
Bouke de Vries, Memory Vessel XVI and Memory Vessel  XIII

To the left, contemporary glass following the original form of its contents, the collected remains of a 17th C Japanese Arita ewer, set on a walnut base. To the right, the collected remains of an 18th C Dutch Delft jug, set on a padouk base.

collect 2014
Jacqueline Ryan, on the Adrian Sassoon stand

collect 2014

collect 2014

Helena Bengtsson

collect 2014
Eric Thikking tea pots

collect 2014
Harumi Nakashima  – Forms that Reveal the Absurd. Porcelain with cobalt in -glaze

collect 2014
 Sachi Fujikake at the Yufuku stand

With pieces in the V&A, and well known in Japan, Fujikake is known for his biomorphic porcelain sculptures. Most impressive of all is that his work is entirely hand built – porcelain is extremely difficult to manipulate by free-hand.

collect 2014

At Galerie Rosemarie Jager: Ja-Kyung Shin

2014-05-11 12.30.19

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5 comments

Reply

How do they get the china shards into the glass? Amazing.

Reply

@Clare: Ni idea, but they are extraordinary, aren’t they?! LLGxx

Reply

I think Bouke de Vries’ ‘memory vessels’ are incredible. Also a great project to cite when discussing the worth of fragments over complete works (key to my art history course!) – thank you for introducing his work to me! x

Reply

@Tamsin | A Certain Adventure: Comments like this make it all worthwhile! Good luck with your course. (I absolutely love these pieces too.) LLGxx

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